Have you suffered from a hip dislocation in the past and are currently experiencing hip pain?

NYC Hip surgeon Dr. Vigdorchik is here to help you with your hip dislocation. With a non-operative priority, state-of-the-art surgical techniques and a track record of positive outcomes both performing and teaching other hip surgeons at the prestigious NYU Langone Medical Center, you can trust Dr. Jonathan Vigdorchik to provide you with an accurate diagnoses and positive outcome for your hip dislocation.

Schedule an appointment – (646) 350-4499

If your hip dislocation has been caused by a sudden or chronic injury and is accompanied by any of the symptoms below, please call New York City’s innovative hip surgeon Dr. Vigdorchik immediately and have someone drive you to our office.

  • Severe hip pain that spreads to the legs, knees, and back
  • Leg on affected side appears shorter than other leg
  • Inability to walk or move the leg
  • Loss of feeling in the foot or ankle

About your hips

The hip joint is a ball-and-socket type joint where the thigh bone (femur) meets the bones that make up the pelvis, include the ilium, ischium, and pubis. The ball-shaped knob of the thighbone fits into a socket in the hipbone. A hip dislocation occurs when the ball of the thigh bone moves out of place within the socket of the pelvic bone.

In order for the bones to move against each other without pain, a white cartilage about ¼ an inch thick is kept slippery by fluid. The cartilage also serves as a “shock absorber” and changes shape when compressed. The bones are held together by large ligaments, tendons, and muscles surrounding the hip joint, called the joint capsule.

When working properly, your hip joint provides a full range of motion in your legs, allowing you to walk, run and crouch, among other physical activities.

The hip joint is built to withstand large amounts of wear and tear over a lifetime of activity, but can be susceptible to sudden and chronic injuries. These injuries can cause severe pain, and proper medical treatment is often necessary for recovery.

Common causes of hip dislocation

Hip dislocations can only occur when a strong force is applied to the hip joint, and often times it’s easy to see the dislocation. A dislocated hip usually appears deformed, and may be bruised, discolored, or swollen. Hip dislocations are often very painful.

Since hip dislocations are caused by a traumatic events, they are often accompanied by related injuries such as fractures in the pelvis, legs, and knee.

The vast majority of hip dislocations are posterior dislocations, in which the thighbone is pushed out of the socket in a backwards direction. This leaves the knee and foot rotated toward the middle of the body. Posterior dislocations frequently occur during car accidents in which the knee hits the dashboard during the collision, forcing the thighbone backward.

Occasionally, hip dislocations are anterior dislocations, where the thighbone slips out of socket in a forward direction, with the knee and foot rotated away from the middle of the body.

Hip dislocation symptoms include:

  • Severe hip pain and pain that spreads to the legs, knees, and back
  • Leg on affected side appears shorter than other leg
  • Hip joint appears deformed
  • Inability to walk or move the leg
  • Loss of feeling in the foot or ankle

Commonly treated hip dislocations

Hip dislocation conditions include posterior dislocations, and anterior dislocations. Posterior dislocations account for approximately 90% of all hip dislocations, while anterior account for the remaining 10%.

Posterior dislocations are caused by the thighbone being pushed out of the socket in a backwards direction. This leaves the knee and foot rotated toward the middle of the body.

Occasionally, hip dislocations are anterior dislocations, in which the thighbone slips out of socket in a forward direction. This leaves the knee and foot rotated away from the middle of the body.

Hip dislocation treatment options

Hip dislocations are treated using a variety of non-surgical and surgical procedures. Initial treatment often includes RICE: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. In some cases the dislocated joint may go back into place naturally.

If the joint doesn’t go back into place naturally, closed reduction, open reduction, or physical therapy may be required.

Closed reduction involves the doctor administering an anesthetic or sedative and manipulating the hip bones back into their proper position.

Open reduction involves the doctor performing surgery on the hip. Open reduction is performed when torn soft tissues, bony fragments, or other complications such as a broken thigh or pelvic bones block the thighbone from returning to the socket.

Physical therapy is sometimes necessary to help with recovery strengthen the hip muscles.

Dr. Vigdorchik is a strong believer in prioritizing non-operative treatment, only recommending surgery when most beneficial to the patient. To determine the best treatment option for the patient, Dr. Vigdorchik carefully considers the patient’s condition, medical history, lifestyle, and personal preferences.

Hip dislocation articles

Learn more about hip dislocations with these educational articles from Dr. Vigdorchik:

  • Coming soon

Call us immediately

If you’re suffering from any of the symptoms of hip dislocation below, call New York City hip surgeon Dr. Vigdorchik immediately to schedule an appointment. If left untreated, hip dislocations often become more severe over time. Have your hip dislocation treated as soon as possible.

  • Severe hip pain and pain that spreads to the legs, knees, and back
  • Leg on affected side appears shorter than other leg
  • Hip joint appears deformed
  • Inability to walk or move the leg
  • Loss of feeling in the foot or ankle